I live and I love / Romancero Gitano
Hi, my name's N and I come from Europe. I'm a busy student and when I'm not chasing deadlines at University, I love to take photos, cook and enjoy in little things that everyday life brings. My 'diet' consists of design, architecture, literature, movies, fashion, good food and wine. This visual diary is a mélange of things I find inspiring and aesthetically pleasing, other than that, this tumblr's existence has no higher purpose... Thank you for stopping by! :)
I live and I love / Romancero Gitano
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cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

House in Balsthal by Pascal Flammer | via
Pascal Flammer created this timber house in Balsthal. There are two principal floors; one set 75 cm below the earth, one 1.50 m above. The ground floor consists of one single family room with a noticeably low horizontal ceiling. In this space there is a physical connection with the nature outside the continuous windows.
The space above is the inverse. This floor is divided into four equal rooms with 6m high ceilings. The height defines the space. Large windows open to composed views of the wheat field. Whereas the ground floor is about connecting with the visceral nature of the context, the floor above is about observing nature – a more distant and cerebral activity.
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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paris2london:

(via Jenna Lyons | Into The Gloss)
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Lorraine Pascale Harper’s 1994
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Karin Krapfenbauer and Markus Hausleitner
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Ellsworth Kelly 
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Pablo Picasso :D 
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Casa Pite
Smiljan Radic
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Jenna Lyons
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dailyartjournal:

Xiaohong Chen
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"I gave myself permission to care, because there are a lot of people in this world who are afraid of caring, or afraid of showing that they care because it’s uncool. It’s uncool to have passion. It’s so much easier to lose when you’ve shown everyone how much you don’t care if you win or lose. It’s much harder to lose when you show that you care, but, you’ll never win, unless you also stand to lose. Don’t be afraid of your passion."
Tom Hiddleston
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shoeboxtony:

Adolph Gottlieb. Mist. 1961. Guggenheim Museum